We commonly see probiotics in yogurt and cultured milk drinks. And every time we hear the word ‘probiotics,’ we immediately think of yogurt and milk kefir. While these dairy products are good sources of probiotics, they are not recommended for people with lactose intolerance.

Your gut is unique in many ways. Therefore, it may not be able to tolerate certain foods that other people regularly eat. Some of the most common food intolerances are lactose (dairy) intolerance, gluten (grain) intolerance, and legume (beans) intolerance. If you have any of these food intolerances, it is always best to stay away from these foods or any products containing these foods. If not, you might experience bloating, irritable bowel syndrome, nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain.

So what happens if you have lactose intolerance and you need your natural whole food dose of probiotics?

Truth be told, probiotics are not only found in dairy products. There are several dairy-free foods that can serve you just as well as a good strong source of natural probiotics.

Firstly the supplement pill alternatives

There are many products and probiotics that dont include dairy make sure you read the label and read everything thoroughly many companies produce probiotics without and dairy in them including.

Dairy Free Options

 garden of life primal defense ultra Garden of Life Primal Defense Ultra culturelle digestive health daily formula Culturelle Digestive Health garden of life probiotics supplement for women Garden of Life Probiotics Supplement for Women
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Whole Food Based Alternatives

 

1. Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is made by fermenting finely cut cabbage. Usually added with salt, it undergoes fermentation with the help of Lactobacillus, a probiotic strain naturally found in the small intestines. Aside from its rich lactobacilli content, sauerkraut is also rich in vitamins B and C. But wait; there’s more! The fermentation process of the cabbage allows the production of a substance called isothiocyanate which lowers the risk of cancer and tumor formation. Homemade sauerkraut is crispy in texture. However, canned sauerkraut tends to turn mushy.

2. Kombucha

Sauerkraut is made by fermenting finely cut cabbage. Usually added with salt, it undergoes fermentation with the help of Lactobacillus, a probiotic strain naturally found in the small intestines. Aside from its rich lactobacilli content, sauerkraut is also rich in vitamins B and C. But wait; there’s more! The fermentation process of the cabbage allows the production of a substance called isothiocyanate which lowers the risk of cancer and tumor formation. Homemade sauerkraut is crispy in texture. However, canned sauerkraut tends to turn mushy.
Kombucha is made by fermenting tea (either black tea or green tea). Once mixed with sugar, fermentation process is initiated by a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast. This sour-tasting tonic is loaded with essential probiotics such as lactobacillus, gluconacetobacter, zygosaccharomyces, and acetobacter. It also contains vitamin B12 and glucaric acid that has detoxifying properties. It’s possible to brew your kombucha at home or buy expensively bottled kombucha from stores.

3. Sauerruben

Sauerruben is fermented turnips that undergo the same pickling process as the sauerkraut. Shredded turnips are layered with salt and massaged to release the juice. The liquid and salt will make up the brine that allows good bacteria to ferment the turnips. Sauerruben is rich in probiotics and vitamin C.

4. Miso

Miso is fermented soybeans with salt and fungi. It is used to pickle vegetables and meats, but it is most commonly mixed with soup stock to make miso soup. Any foods that have undergone fermentation process are rich in beneficial bacteria, and miso is no exception. However, when exposed to extreme heat, the good bacteria in miso is destroyed. In preparing miso soup, wait until the stock has cooled down enough to dissolve the miso. This way, all the probiotic content of the miso is still intact. Miso is also rich in vitamins B6, zinc, manganese, and phosphorous.

5. Kimchi

Kimchi is a traditional side dish made from fermented radish and napa cabbage. Similar to sauerkraut, shredded cabbage or radish is layered with salt and left to be fermented by good bacteria including lactobacillus. This Korean dish also contains other essential nutrients such as vitamins A, B1, B2, C, calcium, beta-carotene, and iron.

If it’s fermented, it’s good
Fermenting food allows the growth of good bacteria in foods. And milk isn’t the only food that can be fermented; almost any foods can be fermented. Vegetables, tea, fruit juice, bread, ketchup, and much more. There are endless alternative sources of probiotics that you can take instead of dairy-based products.